Category Archives: Workshop

Stem Cells and their Use

What are stem cells and how are we using them in the knee?

Today on the SMB, we are joined by Dr. Evan Meeks who helps educate us on stem cells and their use.

What is New In Knees

Dr. Meeks explains that stem cells are found within the body and they can change into other types of cells.  They can be used to treat musculoskeletal injuries (ie regrow muscle, ligament or cartilage) However, Dr. Meeks cautions us that stem cells are a “new and budding area that has theoretically huge potential for the future but the science is still in the early stages.”

What can make you a good candidate for stem cell therapy?

Type and degree of injury are important factors when considering stem cell treatment as well as the patient’s age.

How are patients prepped for this procedure?

The best preparation we can give a patient is to educate them and to manage their expectations.  

Are there ethical issues regarding stem cell treatment?

The main ethical concern is embryonic stem cells.  However, currently, it is illegal to use embryonic stem cells for treatment.  They are only used for research. Dr. Meeks cautions that embryonic stem cells are unsafe right now.  They can turn into any type of cell and we can’t control it.

As secondary school athletic trainers will we encounter this often?

Dr. Meeks explains that it is pretty rare since or population is younger and still heals well.  He does say occasionally it can be used to help surgical outcomes with meniscus repair or bone stimulation.

What is Dr. Meeks’ prognosis for stem cell usage for the next 10-20 years?

“It will be the new frontier for musculoskeletal medicine.”

What one thing should AT’s know regarding stem cell treatment?

Dr. Meek’s feels stem cell treatment is the new pitch count in athletic training.  We must educate and disseminate the correct information.

About Dr. Meeks

Dr. Evan Meeks is an assistant professor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Dr. Meeks specializes in sports medicine with an emphasis on arthroscopy and minimally invasive techniques to treat injuries of the shoulder, hip, and knee. During his training, Dr. Meeks worked extensively with professional and college teams in the Houston area, including the Houston Texans, Houston Rockets, Houston Astros, Houston Dynamo, and the University of Houston athletic program.

As a former college athlete, Dr. Meeks has the unique ability to see injuries from the perspective of both the athlete and the physician.

Contact us:

Dr. Evan Meeks – Evan.G.Meeks@uth.tmc.edu

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

Social Media Etiquette – 605

Dinner etiquette means starting with the outside and working your way in with the silverware. Social Media Etiquette is an everchanging environment but certain truths hold solid.

Is Social Media important for the Sports Medicine Professional?

YES! – there is so much to learn. Find a good knowledge stream on twitter or facebook and you will be completely filled. It can be a source of customers and advocacy as well as connection and mentoring.

CAUTION!!! – Social media can also become a breeding ground for decay if you choose to follow and engage with “dead fruit.”

Do these things

  1. Know your WHY
  2. Start with ONE
  3. Know your LIMITS
  4. be YOURSELF
  5. Remember there are real people reading these
  6. CHECK your spelling and grammar
  7. PROTECT patient privacy
Social Media Etiquette

Don't do these things

  1. Use foul/inappropriate language
  2. Use inappropriate pictures
  3. Share pictures of videos with ANY injury details
  4. Think “permission to post” clears you legally
  5. Forget there are real people on the receiving end
  6. Be too serious
  7. Forget your WHY

Tips and Tricks

  • Be a sponge first
    • If you are new to Social Media start with one platform and be a creeper for a little while. Read posts, watch others and see what is normal for that platform.
  • Use different apps for different accounts
    • TweetDeck for Personal and Twitter app for Bussiness or
    • Hoot suite for all personal accounts and native apps for professional
  • Tools to check that spelling
    • Grammarly – checks spelling and grammar
    • PhraseExpress – allows me to type “SMB” and it automatically gets expanded to “Sports Medicine Broadcast”
    • TextExpander is another option

Social Media Etiquette for Sports Medicine – Jeremy Jackson LAT

Social Media Etiquette for Sports Medicine – Jeremy Jackson LAT

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Monday, 10 June 2019

Contact us:

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

Hoist logo; rapid hydration; social media etiquette

Relative Energy Deficiency – 602

Christina Curry-King joins Ray Olivo to discuss her presentation on Identification & Implication of Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) at the Memorial Hermann Sports Medicine Update.

Relative energy Deficiency, Christina Curry king

Baseline tools to ID REDs

Relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S) is a syndrome in which disordered eating (or low energy availability), amenorrhoea/oligomenorrhoea, and decreased bone mineral density (osteoporosis and osteopenia) are present.

wikipedia

Questionnaires – leafq is a lengthy 50 – 75 questions

BEDA9 – is a shorter 9 question survey and a great place to get started.

What do you do after Identifying those at risk?

Sit down and get a 24-hour recall of what they are doing and eating.
– Could be inadvertent due to scheduling
– Or people who are struggling do to eliminating certain foods.

What about the subjective portion of the evaluation?

Athletes struggling with relative energy deficiency may report still being tired ad lethargic.

Try these things:

  • getting some good nutrient-rich food in around those training times
  • Ask about sleep
  • probe deeper
    • Are you fearful of certain foods?
    • Was it from reading an article
    • Weight gain
    • Hesitant to eat before or after the event
    • Not being able to perform
    • Bad experience with certain food

Recommendations for AT involvement with cafeteria 

Something is better than nothing

  • Add color
  • Bring some fruit and veggies from home
  • Pre-activity quick snack
  • Some sort of granola bar
  • Or banana
  • Applesauce
  • Shelf-stable and portable
  • Even juice like apple or orange on the way out the door

What about the fast-food budget family

Is there a grilled option or fruit and yogurt option?

Thoughts on supplementation?

You will get more bang for your buck by buying real food…you will get more energy in food then you will ever get in a supplement

Certain supplements have a place if the other standards are met first.

Sleep calculations – 

Hands down top recovery tool

8-9 hours per night sleep minimum is critical for injury prevention.

Watch the presentation on Relative Energy Deficiency

Identification & Implication of Relative Engery Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) – Christina Curry King, MS, RD, LD

Identification & Implication of Relative Engery Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) – Christina Curry King, MS, RD, LD

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Monday, June 10, 2019

Contact us:

Christina Curry King – christina.curry@memorialhermann.org

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

Relative Energy Deficiency, Frio Hydration; John Harmon

Dealing with Challenging Parents – 599

Have Challenging Parents?

I am not talking about your in-laws being challenging parents. We are not even discussing the relationship you have with your own parents.

Challenging parents and family members of patients can ruin your day and cause some serious headaches for Athletic Trainers.

Charlotte Koenig works for Memorial Hermann in risk management and knows a few things about dealing with challenging patients and family members.  Today on the podcast she gives us some great steps to follow when dealing with a challenging athlete, parent or coach and also helps us set and follow through with boundaries.

Dealing with Challenging Parents

Are you someone who says, “I’m sorry,” often?

Charlotte believes that is a phrase that is empty and doesn’t have much substance   She recommends changing the “I’m sorry,” to “I apologize.”  

Use the 5-minute rule speaking with a challenging parent?

When Charlotte is engaged in a face to face or phone conversation with someone who is challenging she makes sure to wrap things up in about 5 minutes.  

Active listening and repeating back to them what you think they are saying can diffuse situations.  

One phrase she uses often is, “What I hear you saying is...”

When do you ditch email and talk to someone face to face?

“Compassion can’t come through text or email.”  Every person can insert there own emotion when reading a text or email so Charlotte believes that it is always best to communicate verbally when you are dealing with someone who might be upset.

How do you de-escalate a situation that has gotten heightened?

“Don’t throw fuel to the fire,” when dealing with someone that is challenging.  Remain calm, meet them where they are and see the whole person not just this incident.

Sign up for emails:

Visit sportsmedicinebroadcast.com/EMAIL to stay in touch and get important news

Dealing with the Challenging Patient/Family Member – Charlotte Keoning, BSN, RN, CPHRM, FASHRAM

Dealing with the Challenging Patient/Family Member – Charlotte Keoning, BSN, RN, CPHRM, FASHRAM

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Monday, June 10, 2019

Contact us:

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

FrioHydration; frio hydration; Get Frio; Best in class; Waterboy; wisstech; hydration station; sports medicine broadcast; Jeremy Jackson; Rob McFarlin; Challenging parents

Skin With Kathy Nguyen – 596

Have questions about infections??? Joins as we discuss Skin with Kathy Nguyen

Who is Dr. Kathy Nguyen?

Dr. Kathy Nguyen is a primary care/sports medicine physician.  She is a team physician for multiple high schools, helps with colleges in the Houston area and is the team physician for the Houston Dash soccer team.

Skin With Kathy Nguyen

Do you know what is considered best practice and recommended by research?

As athletic trainers, we routinely see a variety of skin issues happening with our athletes.

Blisters: do you pop it or not?

Today on the podcast Dr. Nguyen relays to us the best practice in issues as common as blisters and as serious as tinea issues that may be resistant to topical antibiotics.

For example

At minute 2:10 on the podcast, Dr. Nguyen says she always recommends leaving the blister if possible.

Around 4 minutes on “Skin with Kathy Nguyen”, she discusses wound care specialist opinion on new skin growth and scarring.

What are truths and what are myths?

Through research and discussion with other wound care specialists, she helps us sift through what are considered old wives tales and gives us concrete reasons to refer a skin issue or lesion to a doctor.

We have discussed Dermatology and skin before:

Digging into dermatology with Dr. Jimmy Gonzalez – 287

Skin Infections and Sports – 96

Dr. Chassay on Skin Conditions – 542

Topicals and Wound Care – 583

Watch the “Skin with Kathy Nguyen” presentation

Dermatological Issues in Athetlics – Tu Dan "Kathy" Nguyen, MD, CAQSM

Dermatological Issues in Athetlics – Tu Dan "Kathy" Nguyen, MD, CAQSM

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Monday, June 10, 2019

Contact us:

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

McDonald; Dermoneuromodulation; Medbridge; CEUs Online CEUs; affiliate link

Foot Injuries In Sports – 592

Foot Injuries in Sports are Increasing

30 – 40% of injuries seen in clinics are foot and ankle related

Dr. Taggart Gauvain shares some of his research and clinical knowledge with Shawn Ready, ATC LAT at the Memorial Hermann Sports Medicine Update

Foot Injuries In Sports; Shawn Ready; Tagart Gauvain

Some of the reasons we are seeing more foot injuries in sports:

  • Bigger athletes
  • Stronger athletes
  • The desire for lighter footwear to increase speed
  • Faster athletes
  • Increased mobility in footwear

However, Dr. Gauvain discusses the lack of research and evidence to confirm that lighter shoes are contributing to the growth in injury.

What are some of the troublesome foot and ankle injuries?

High-ankle sprain –

  • separation of the tibia and fibula.
  • We do not really get into the whole fix it after a week of rehab topic… but it is really controversial in the high school setting

Dr. Gauvain recommends the following for high ankle sprains:

  • Treat each one individually
  • adjust the plan to fit the need and injury
  • in general non-weight bearing in a cast or boot for 6-8 weeks
  • begin therapy for the mobility of joint
  • after mobility of joint returns begin working on agility and return to sport activity

Jones Fracture –

  • occurs at the base of the 5th metatarsal
  • non-union occurs about 10% of the time
  • Re-fracture rates are reported post-surgical intervention

Some have tried adjusting diet and increasing vitamin D

Plantar Plate / Turf Toe

  • Sesamoid fracture complicates things…
  • Some are born with bipartite bones
  • We lack great fixation techniques because of the size of the bone.
  • Mobility vs stability is a huge issue with plantar plate injuries. 
  • Finding the balance is always key

Lis Franc

  • Discuss the change in the mechanism of injury
  • Roma arch configuration gives a great understanding of the importance
  • orthotics may be partially to blame

How can ATs be more effective at collaborating with Doctors and diagnosing foot injuries?

  • Always discuss with an athlete the injury and what you think.
  • Tell them and write down what you would like to see
    • weight-bearing films are crucial
    • need bi-lateral comparison
  • Plantar Bruising
  • Dorsal Swelling
  • Inability to return to practice after rehab

Do we have a window for getting films on a midfoot sprain?

Refer to the above clinical signs as well as a few missed practices.

A missed diagnosis can create long term debilitating arthritis.

If there is a suspected Bone Bruise then Dr. Gauvain likes to refer for an MRI to ensure there is not something being missed

Foot & Ankle Injuries in Sports – Taggart Gauvain, MD

Foot & Ankle Injuries in Sports – Taggart Gauvain, MD

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Monday, June 10, 2019

Other Foot and Ankle podcasts on the Sports Medicine Broadcast

Here is a list: https://sportsmedicinebroadcast.com/?s=foot

Contact us:

Taggart Gauvain –

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

PhysicalTherapy.com; 1freecourse; continued; Foot Injuries In Sports

Reducing Injury Risk – 588

Dr. Layci Harrison has a specialty in Movement Screens and their role in Reducing Injury Risk.

What is FMS training?

A Tool for identifying the potential for injury due to limitations in specific movements. It was developed by Gray Cook

Getting certified is a good idea and can really help you take advantage of the tests and results but it is not mandatory o use the tests to help identify potential issues.

What is the key to Reducing Injury Risk with FMS?

Protect before you correct

What tests does it involve?

  1. Deep Squat
  2. Hurdle Step
    • Tight Hip flexor may cause limitations in testing
  3. In-Line Lunge
  4. Active Straight leg raise
  5. Rotary Stability- probably the hardest one
  6. Shoulder Mobility- Hard to access
  7. Trunk Push up

Scoring the movement screens

0-pain in any movement
1- no pain but unable to do the movement
2- Complete movement but show some compensation
3- Complete movement no pain or compensation
A score of 14 or less equals a more likelihood of injury.
21 is a perfect FMS score

Dr. Harrison's Tips:

Use the score sheet from FMS, easy to find on Google.

It can help screen and individualize training.

Tai Chi or yoga may also help balance

  • Balance testing can be accomplished using BESS and YBT
    • BESS- Static balance
    • YBT- dynamic balance

A large part of reducing Injury Risk is knowing what to do with the data once we have it…but more on that another time.

Thanks for hanging out with us live in Katy, Texas at the Memorial Hermann Sports Medicine Update

Shout Out to Patrick Ohaver for typing up the show notes

Layci Harrison, Reducing Injury Risk; preventicx

Want to watch the presentation?

Functional Movement Screenings: Strategies to Reduce Injury Risk – Laci Harrison, PhD, LAT, ATC

Functional Movement Screenings: Strategies to Reduce Injury Risk – Laci Harrison, PhD, LAT, ATC

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Monday, June 10, 2019

More about Dr. Layci Harrison

My research interests include functional movement and how movement is related to balance ability. Specifically, I am interested in ways to improve functional movement and the effects of improved functional movement scores on injury risk.

I am also studying how the effects of balance training can be crossed from the trained limb to the contralateral limb following lower-body injuries as a way to expedite the injury rehabilitation process

Dr. Harrison was also on the Sports Medicine Broadcast…

Preventicx with Kevin Robel – 569

Call to Action:

Order some HOIST and save using “TheSMB” as your promo code

Contact us:

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

Hoist logo; rapid hydration; Reducing Injury Risk

Care For The Active Wrist – 582

Dr. Candice Teunis joins Shawn Ready to discuss care for the active wrist.

Can't Miss Injuries of the Hand; care for the active wrist

How do we Care For The Active Wrist

One of the huge tips she continued to share was REFER ANYTHING YOU REDUCE!!!

I have reduced injuries before and since meeting Dr. Teunis I always refer them to get an x-ray before allowing them to return to play.

Mallet Finger:

What is it: Extensor tendon rupture or avulsion involving DP joint.

Treatment– Splint religiously! 6-10 weeks

Alumaform vs. Stax Splint- Not all 1 size fits all. consult with your local hand doctor to see what they prefer and why. discuss ways to ensure patient compliance and seamless transition from office to AT Facility.

NOT ALL Mallet Fingers can be splinted, some require surgical intervention.

Jersey Finger-

What is it – Flexed finger pulled into extension (commonly ring finger, 75%) rupturing flexor tendon.

Treatment:

Dislocations

Dorsal Dislocation-  splint 1 week, then buddy tape

Volar dislocation – much less common, extensor mechanism disruption, hard to reduce

Mimickers-

  • Traumatic Boutonniere
  • Skiers Thumb

Scaphoid Fractures

  • Hard to treat
  • hard to diagnose.
  • Common in football – “see these in December”

Scaphoid fractures…about 40% are missed and that is bad news, they take several months to heal due to poor blood flow. if it dies you get arthritis in your 20s.

Fall on outreached hand (FOOSH)

Need more on Care for the Active Wrist?

Live from Memorial Hermann's Sports Medicine Update 2019 Dr. Teunis lectures on Can't-Miss Injuries of the Hand and you can see that presentation here on Facebook

Can't Miss Injuries of the Hand – Candice Teunis, MD

Can't Miss Injuries of the Hand – Candice Teunis, MD

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Contact us:

Dr. Teunis – Email

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

Abdominal and Thorax Injuries – 579

Dr. Benedict Ifedi, MD, CAQSM covers Abdominal and Thorax Injuries from diagnosis to treatment. After his presentation at the Memorial Hermann Sports Medicine Update we get to follow up dig a little deeper.

Have experience with Thorax Injuries?

Dr. Ifedi was around the medical team at the University of Houston when they had an athlete rip his inferior vena cava.

What about getting a soccer ball to the chest causing comotio cordis?

Here are a few previous episodes dealing with the heart

thoraxinjuries, Ifedi, Benjamin, Abdominal injury, Thorax Injury

Check out his presentation broadcast on Facebook live

Diagnosis and Management of Thorax and Abominal Injuries – Benedict Ifedi, MD, CAQSM

Diagnosis and Management of Thorax and Abominal Injuries – Benedict Ifedi, MD, CAQSM

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Monday, June 10, 2019

More about Dr. Ifedi

After graduating magna cum laude with his Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry from the University of Houston, Dr. Benedict Ifedi received his medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He went on to complete his family medicine residency at Memorial Family Medicine Residency in Sugar Land, Texas, where he also served as chief resident. Afterwards he completed a fellowship in sports medicine at Bayfront Health in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Board certified in family medicine and sports medicine, Dr. Ifedi treats patients ages 5 and older. He provides care for sports-related injuries, such as strains, pulls and concussions, as well as wellness and preventive medicine. His clinical interests include management of chronic diseases, exercise medicine and physical activity.

He is an active member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, and American College of Sports Medicine. Patients in Katy and the surrounding communities enjoy his welcoming smile and genuine concern for their well-being. Dr. Ifedi’s goal is to help his patients get back to feeling their best and to help teach them the best methods to achieve optimal health.

In his spare time, he enjoys traveling as well as watching and playing sports.

Call to Action:

Dragonfly Max is here to help you improve efficiency and make best use of your valuable resources. Designed for Athletic Trainers, DragonflyMax can help you improve communication, record keeping and efficiency

Contact us:

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

Stop Using Ice – Gary Reinl – 576

Stop Using Ice!!!

Stop Using Ice; Gary Reinl; Ray Olivo; John Ciecko

Buy a FrioHydration Unit that will hold ice for days and then STOP USING ICE and be done…

Actually, this is about using Ice as a treatment option for injuries.

In his book, Iced, The Illusionary Treatment Option, Gary Reinl covers almost everything we talk about here.

Stop Using Ice, Gary Reinl, Delayed healing, congestion of waste

Why should you Stop Using Ice?

There is very little research to support its efficacy

It actually slows the healing down by creating congestion at the damage site. Similar to a lane closure on a freeway due to an accident. when the cars back up the Emergency crew can not get there quickly and the 30-minute commute now takes 90 minutes.

There is no Google or Waze app for the human body. It really tries to repair rather than destroy itself. Let it run its course.

We confuse swelling and inflammation

Swelling can occur when a part of the body becomes inflamed. However, it is caused by the accumulation of fluid in tissues throughout the body, or in a specific region of the body

Inflammation is classified as a protective response from the immune system to injury, infection, or irritation.

Discussion on the SMB not in the book…

Practical application of the principal

  • How to talk to your coaches about it
  • How to talk with your athletes about it
  • How to discuss changing your physician's protocol

Slight exception to the rules:

  • If you have a dislocation and need to transport, ice will reduce swelling which will allow for a better relocation.
  • If you are using it once as an emotional trigger to help calm down the athlete

What About MarcPro

Using my code (TheSMB) helps to ensure your best discount as well as support the SMB

A medical-grade device that can run for hours to relieve the congestion of waste in and around the damaged tissue.

Try out the loaner program and see if it is worth your while – Email Gary@MarcPro.com and mention the Sports Medicine Broadcast and the Loaner Program

Contact us:

Gary Reinl – Email Gary Reinl

Jeremy Jackson

Shawn Readyshawnreadyatc@gmail.com

Ray Olivorayolivo1@gmail.com

Dr. Mark Knoblauchmaknobla@Central.UH.EDU

Dr. Layci Harrisonlharris5@Central.UH.EDU

Bob MarleyBob.Marley@uth.tmc.edu

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:


Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.