Tag Archives: Mike McKenney

Compression Product Roundtable – 618

Today on the podcast Robbie Jenkins from Rapid Reboot talks all things compression therapy in our Compression Roundtable.

Compression Products Roundtable, compression roundtable, robbie Jenkins; mike mckenney

What is Rapid Reboot?

Rapid Reboot is a company that specializes in dynamic compression technology that gives you more value for your money.

Robbie and the team at Rapid Reboot felt like there was a unique opportunity to add more to the market of compression therapy.  They worked to offer more applications and educate on the many opportunities compression therapy has to benefit our athletes.

What benefits does compression therapy offer?

Most often people think of compression therapy in terms of recovery.  Robbie explains that there are many more uses for dynamic compression.  Compression can be beneficial to fluid replacement, lymphatic drainage, injury prevention, and pre-workout, pre-game.

How do you educate on the treatment of the lymphatic system since it is a delicate system that doesn’t require a great deal of pressure?

The lymphatic system is unlike other systems in the body in that it doesn’t pump.  Evidence doesn’t support using tight as possible to treat it. Robbie recommends that you use well below 100mmHG of pressure if there is a lymphatic issue.  However, for healthy individuals that don’t have lymphatic issues you can have 200-300mmHG of pressure combined with sped-up cycle times.  

Are there contraindications for the use of dynamic compression therapy?

Yes.  DVT, blood clots, as well as post-cancer patients, are contraindications to utilizing compression therapy.  DVT is a different scenario as compression therapy is contraindicated if a DVT is present, however, compression therapy has been shown to prevent DVT’s.  Surgeons often prescribe compression therapy immediately post-op to prevent the formation of them.  

Robbie reminds us that Rapid Reboot is FDA approved and regulated for over the counter use. 

What research is available or what is the best practice for the use of compression therapy?

Physicians that Rapid Reboot has spoken to highlight how dynamic compression can help with venous return and how important that is to the cyclical nature of our vascular system.

Robbie finds that with the fluid gathering that tends to happen in our lower extremities due to gravity that the Lower Extremity boots are most beneficial to the entire body, though he loves the hip attachment, as well as probably most beneficial to athletes as all utilize the lower body.

What is one thing Robbie wants AT’s to know regarding dynamic compression therapy?

Don’t put it into one box.  Dynamic compression therapy has many benefits, can be used multiple times per day and is safe to use for as long as you want.  Pre/post workout and games, prevention as well as post-injury, tight muscles or DOMS are many of the uses for this therapy.

Watch the live stream:

Recovery Device Roundtable – Compx

Recovery Device – Compex with Rick Stassi

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Thursday, June 27, 2019

Previous Compression Roundtable conversations

Recovery Pump with Brian Carberry

Call to Action

Instagram us with your favorite uses of compression products @SportsMedicineBroadcast

Contact us:

Jeremy Jackson – Host of The Sports Medicine Broadcast

John Ciecko – jciecko@bloomfield.org

Alisha M Pennington – alisha@theatvantage.com

Mike McKenney – m.mckenney@northeastern.edu

Mike Hopper – Mike.Hopper@bishoplynch.org

Clint Sanders – clint@dragonflyathletics.com

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:

Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

Compression Roundtable; Frio Hydration; Houston Methodist
Check out these awesome Frio Hydration units that can literally pay fro themselves

Cramping Neurology – 573

In Cramping Science interview #1 with Dr. Kevin Miller, we did not even get to Cramping Neurology. We spent about 90 packed minutes discussing your questions and the role hydration plays in cramping.

Dr. Miller and Mike McKenney knew there was no way to do justice to cramping science without addressing the neurology component.

Cramp – an involuntary painful contraction of skeletal muscle brought on by a variety of factors. This podcast focuses on cramps related to the exercise of healthy individuals.

There is a teeter-totter between excitation and inhibition of the muscles from the nerves.

Cramping Neurology, nerve cell, axon, dendrite, Dr. Kevin Miller

What is Cramping Neurology?

Most basic definition: the role of the nervous system in cramping

About 8 minutes in Dr. Miller discusses the 3 main nerve cramp theories:

Central Theory –

This is the best supported through research stating the cramp occurs at the nerve cell body

There are two threshold levels for the cell body to cause a contraction known as a “bipolar state.”

Peripheral Theory –

Happens along the axon or end of the motor neuron.

We can stop a cramp from occurring by blocking the afferent activity with a nerve block to the tendon…but it is not always true.

Muscle Fiber Level Theory –

Least favorable among researchers but says that it happens at the muscle fiber level

Does the brain adjust and make the cramp easier?

Around minute 15 Mike asks if cramps can become a learned response from the brain

Of course, Dr. Kevin Miller has an answer that is helpful but not definitive

He does remind us:

  • each cramp is unique
  • there are many factors
  • frequent crampers need to know their triggers

Prefer to watch on Facebook Live?

Contact us:

Jeremy Jackson

Mike McKenney – email

Dr. Kevin Miller – email

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:

Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

Medbridge, Medbridge Ed, Medbridge education, Cramping Neurology, Dr. Kevin Miller

Want to see the rest of our cramping science podcasts?

Cramping Science with Dr. Kevin Miller

Cramping Science with Dr. Sandra Fowkes-Godek

NASA Engineered formula – The Right Stuff

Isotonic Drinks with Kari Beltran

Cramping Science Research with Dr. Sandra Fowkes-Godek

Neurology of a Cramp with Dr. Kevin Miller

Cramping Science with Kevin Miller – 570

What do you know about Cramping Science?

I do not know a whole lot about Cramping Science, but luckily Mike McKenney and Dr. Kevin Miller are here to share tons of knowledge.

Who is Kevin Miller?

Dr. Kevin Miller is a Full Professor in the Athletic Training Program at Central Michigan University.  His research interests include the causes, treatments, and prevention of exertional heat illness with a specific emphasis on exercise-associated muscle cramping. 

He has published over 50 peer-reviewed manuscripts in medical journals and presented over 90 international, national, or regional presentations on topics related to heat illness. 

He has co-authored several national and international position statements including the NATA Position Statement on Exertional Heat Illness; the Statement of the Third International Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia Consensus Development Conference; and the NATA round table on Malignant Hyperthermia in Physically-Active Populations. 

Dr. Miller is a member of the Korey Stringer Institute’s Medical and Science Advisory Board; a member of the Editorial Boards for the Journal of Athletic Training; Exercise Physiology; Sport and Exercise Nutrition; and Athletic Training and Sports Health Care

He is Chair of the Michigan Athletic Trainers Society Research Assistance Committee; NATA liaison to the Canadian Athletic Therapists Association; and member of the NATA’s International Committee.

Did you get lost in all of those titles?

Like I said, I do not know a whole lot of TRUTH about cramping. So I am here to keep it simple and not too nerdy.

What to do when you are cramping:

The fastest way to “fix” a cramp is static stretching. If we prevent the muscle from shortening then we are preventing it from cramping.

Anything ingested is going to take about 10 minutes to provide relief…

Except small volumes of pickle juice seem to make them relax after about 90 seconds. So stretch and give pickle juice right away.

When a cramp starts, will it go away?

For about an hour after a cramp the threshold for cramping is decreased even if the muscle is no longer cramping, it is still standing on the edge.

Recommendations for preventing a cramp?

  • ask good questions
  • know that each patient and cramp is unique
  • look for trends
  • have them keep a cramp journal
  • start early in the day with fluid and sodium replacements
  • drink through out the day when thirsty

Want to see the rest of our cramping science podcasts?

Cramping Science with Dr. Sandra Fowkes-Godek

NASA Engineered formula – The Right Stuff

Isotonic Drinks with Kari Beltran

Cramping Science Research with Dr. Sandra Fowkes-Godek

Neurology of a Cramp with Dr. Kevin Miller

Contact Us

Dr. Kevin Miller – email – mille5k@cmich.edu

Mike McKenney – m.mckenney@neu.edu

Jeremy Jackson

These people LOVE ATs and help the SMB pay the bills:

Frio Hydration – Superior Hydration products.

MioTech – meeting all of your sports medicine supply needs

PhysicalTherapy.com – use promo code “1FREECOURSE” to start for free

DragonflyMax – one-stop EMR

HOIST – no matter your reason for dehydration DRINK HOIST

MedBridge Education – Use “TheSMB” to save some, be entered in a drawing for a second-year free and support the podcast.

Watch the Facebook Live

Cramping Science with Kevin Miller

Mike McKenney studied under Kevin Miller. Both are making an impact in the way we understand hydration.Kevin has a long list of hydration and cramping related articles and committee involvement.Join the conversation as part of a series on Cramping Science on the Sports Medicine Broadcast

Posted by Sports Medicine Broadcast on Tuesday, April 9, 2019

War Stories 3 – 437

In preparation for a recent podcast I asked:

I got a lot of great stories and knew we had to share them here on the podcast.

Possibly my two favorite were

  1. Dislocated shoulder while napping and
  2. Sprained ankle while napping.

Bubba Wilson joins me as we read these tweets and add some commentary.  I loved these responses. I have screenshotted most of them and pasted them in the show notes.

Also, Laurie Beth gave a shout out to her mentor Leah Cox and we read it on the show.  Always remember the ones who got you here.

Show Notes

 

War Stories 2 – 436

In preparation for a recent podcast I asked:

I got a lot of great stories and knew we had to share them here on the podcast.

Possibly my two favorite were

  1. Dislocated shoulder while napping and
  2. Sprained ankle while napping.

Bubba Wilson joins me as we read these tweets and add some commentary.  I loved these responses. I have screenshotted most of them and pasted them in the show notes.

Also, Laurie Beth gave a shout out to her mentor Leah Cox and we read it on the show.  Always remember the ones who got you here.

Show Notes

 

War Stories from Twitter #1 – 435

In preparation for a recent podcast I asked:

I got a lot of great stories and knew we had to share them here on the podcast.

Possibly my two favorite were

  1. Dislocated shoulder while napping and
  2. Sprained ankle while napping.

Bubba Wilson joins me as we read these tweets and add some commentary.  I loved these responses. I have screenshotted most of them and pasted them in the show notes.

Also, Laurie Beth gave a shout out to her mentor Leah Cox and we read it on the show.  Always remember the ones who got you here.

Show Notes

 

Traveling ATR – Treatment on the Road- 327

Have to travel with teams or take your treatments on the road?

Mike McKinney and Josh Ogden work in the college setting where there is a lot of travel.

Greg Evans worked at Wheaton College and now helps School Health bring top quality products to athletic trainers.

Mike Hopper works in the secondary setting and takes several overnight team trips per year.

Alisha Pennington, owner of The ATVantage travels internationally with various teams and had lots of great tips.

From the voice of experience here are some of the best things do to in preparation, on site, maintaining privacy and keeping your hotel room free from being the mobile ATR.

Show Notes 327

YouTube Traveling ATR

Frio Hydration is the official hydration provider of the Sports Medicine Broadcast.

MedBridge Affiliate Link – 1 year subscription for $200

Biceps Tendinitis a Neurological Case study approach – 195

Here is the scenario:

  • 17 year old female volleyball player
  • plays club and school alternating seasons
  • no other sports
  • Pain in anterior shoulder
  • go through normal muscle eval
  • pain on Speed’s test
  • pain with Yergason’s

Start with heat and ROM exercises
Progress to body weight exercises
Then to t-band exercises

Pain free return to play in about 4 weeks

There are lots of other treatment types we did not do, and likely some evaluations we forgot.  One way to improve is to look back, but here we do it with the help of some of my friends and injury experts.

Contact Josh Ogden
Email:

Contact Mike McKenney
Email:

Show Notes 195

email me: info@sportsmedicinebroadcast.com

Don’t forget to register to win gift cards from Sports Health

 

  • Tri-Planar performance above T8 requires stability and control of sagittal and frontal plane movements at the pelvis/hip (below T8)
  • Scapular position is directly related to orientation of Rib-cage over pelvis
  • Finding reference centers for landing mechanics
  • Fatigue
  • Lack of Upper thoracic movement variability (need Subscap/Serratus/Low Trap)
  • TRICEP facilitation
  • In the air, you shoulders become your hips, you need controlled mobility
  • Thoracic mobility is essential for overhead motion
  • Pec inhibition
  • Is it really bicep tendonitis?
    • Differential Diagnoses:
      • Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
      • Rotator Cuff/Supraspinatus
      • Deltoid
      • Trigger/Tender point referral pattern from infraspinatus/anterior deltoid
      • Scap Dyskinesis w/compensatory HG IR = “impingement”?
      • etc.
    • Concurrent findings:
      • Overall Hx
      • Overall tension (e.g. chronic upper trap contraction)
      • Breathing patterns esp. c/restriction upper R chest?
        • Neck breather w/rib cage elevation?
      • Overall posture
        • Slumped shoulders?  Kyphotic?  Lordotic? etc.
        • Forward head/posterior rotated head posture?
        • Shoulder height variance?
      • Spinal rotation/curvature
      • Rib cage/thoracic positioning & mobility
      • Pelvic stability?
      • FA IR/ER & Flex limitations?
    • Imaging – Musculoskeletal US or Arthrogram?
    • Injections?  Relief or no?
  • Treatment (I use PRI techniques mixed with a lot of traditional techniques, but use whatever you have in your toolbox)
    • Frontal Plane control thru pelvis and Transverse plane control thru thorax
    • Rib cage mechanics
      • Breathing pattern retraining (or manual techniques) as needed to restore IR/ER & remove restrictions
    • Restore thoracic rotation
    • Improve Scap Positioning
      • Inhibit Pecs, lats, upper traps, etc. as needed
        • Pec minor involvement?
      • Low Trap & Tricep First
      • Serratus Anterior
        • Make sure scap is moving on thorax due to SA activation, NOT Pec activation
          • SA moves scap on thorax
          • Pec reinforces anterolateral tilt
      • Subscapularis
      • Contralateral side
        • Low Trap/Tricep
        • SA
        • Subscap
        • No injury is unilateral.  Rehabilitate bilaterally.
          • Compensatory thoracic rotation, pelvic obliquity, etc. needs to be addressed.
  • RTP considerations
    • Hitting program
      • Pay attention to core engagement with hitting
      • Flying open into extension reduces scap control
    • Jumping program
      • Poor jump mechanics places the arm in a poor hitting position before the arm motion even starts
      • Poor landing mechanics increase injury risk as well as neurological apprehension = decreased power output and increased stress on LHBT, Cuff, etc.

 

Normalizing Breathing Patterns – 136

Mike McKenney, Josh Ogden, and Jason Robey are all believers in normalizing breathing patterns and breathing posture to help re-align the body and reduce internal stress.    There are a lot of treatments out there that claim to be the answer.  This episode is about using breathing normalization to improve your treatment plan.

Show Notes – 136

Slow Yogic Breathing Through Right and Left Nostril Influences Sympathovagal Balance, Heart Rate Variability, and Cardiovascular Risks in Young Adults

The Healthiest Way To Breathe

PRI

Articles from Josh Ogden

Video for #136

 

Postural Restoration – 125

Mike McKenney of North Eastern University joins us again to talk about postural restoration.  He is joined by Josh Ogden from Baylor University.  I love their thirst for knowledge and understanding for the sake of improving the performance of their respective athletic programs.

Show notes for Episode 125

Video for #125

Masters of Athletic Training at U of H

@UofHMAT